Kenyan girls rebel against female genital mutilation

21 Apr

The Guardian has published an interesting article on two teenage girls in Northern Kenya who refuse to be mutilated. The video potrait of these two young women shows not onyl how much courage and strength it takes to oppose a tradition as deeply embedded in a societies norms and expectations, but also the impact of social change on personal relationships – in this case on the relationship between mothers and daughter. You can watch the video here.

6 Responses to “Kenyan girls rebel against female genital mutilation”

  1. Diana R. Thompson April 22, 2011 at 5:09 am #

    I saw the movie DESERT FLOWER at Barnard College earlier this year. It was fantastic! I will mention the book and the film Saturday, April 23, 2011 at New York University’s conference titled FORUM ON THEATRE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH.
    ***

  2. Addy April 29, 2011 at 5:16 pm #

    It is an emotional 32 minutes video to watch. With all these movements going on with concerned organizations and individuals to stop the practice, it is sad to know that is still happing.
    I just did a paper on this subject for college English class. I felt privileged. The more we write about Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) the more awareness we create. In addition to what I watched on the video (the Kenyan reasoning’s), many communities may not even question the practice or may have long forgotten the reasons for it. Others, however, assertively justify the practice. For example, mothers who have their daughters circumcised believe they are doing the right thing-because their children would become social outcasts if they did not get circumcised. Another less common reason given for infibulation or excision is decreasing a woman’s sexual desire in order to preserve virginity. Infibulation is intended to dull women’s sexual enjoyment, and it appears to be extremely effective. Whatever the reason may be, the practice is not only the violation of the woman’s rights it is mainly emotional and physical abuse. IT NEEDS TO STOP!
    Putting an end to the practice of Female Genital Mutilation should be the aim of every part of the society. In order to do that, it is important to recognize the fact that the problem has several dimensions that need to be addressed. One major area is the need for an enabling environment at the political and legislative level. Health professionals and authorities must be fully involved in the prevention of Female Genital Mutilation. The education sector should also be involved in the area of promoting awareness and empowerment of children and youth.

  3. Addy April 29, 2011 at 6:10 pm #

    “Kenyan girls rebel against female genital mutilation”
    It is an emotional 32 minutes video to watch. With all these movements going on with concerned organizations and individuals to stop the practice, it is sad to know that is still happing.
    I just did a paper on this subject for college English class. I felt privileged. The more we write about Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) the more awareness we create. In addition to what I watched on the video (the Kenyan reasoning’s), many communities may not even question the practice or may have long forgotten the reasons for it. Others, however, assertively justify the practice. For example, mothers who have their daughters circumcised believe they are doing the right thing-because their children would become social outcasts if they did not get circumcised. Another less common reason given for infibulation or excision is decreasing a woman’s sexual desire in order to preserve virginity. Infibulation is intended to dull women’s sexual enjoyment, and it appears to be extremely effective. Whatever the reason may be, the practice is not only the violation of the woman’s rights it is mainly emotional and physical abuse. IT NEEDS TO STOP!
    Putting an end to the practice of Female Genital Mutilation should be the aim of every part of the society. In order to do that, it is important to recognize the fact that the problem has several dimensions that need to be addressed. One major area is the need for an enabling environment at the political and legislative level. Health professionals and authorities must be fully involved in the prevention of Female Genital Mutilation. The education sector should also be involved in the area of promoting awareness and empowerment of children and youth.

  4. Eleonore Miller August 17, 2011 at 6:35 am #

    Living in the California not much is known by the average person about FGM. I, myself, just have become aware thanks to the film and books of Waris Dirie. I am trying to enlighten every woman (and man!) I know about this. The Kenyan film gives me hope. God bless those brave young Pokot women! Truly, they will be the catalyst and causation of other young women in other countries to follow their example.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. FGM in Kenya: hope and criticism « Desert Flower – The Blog - June 8, 2011

    […] Kenya shows that there may be a change in perception of the practice among the younger generation. As we reported earlier, young girls in this remote area in which FGM is widespread are starting to rebel not only against […]

  2. FGM in Kenya: criticism and hope « Desert Flower – The Blog - June 8, 2011

    […] Kenya shows that there may be a change in perception of the practice among the younger generation. As we reported earlier, young girls in this remote area in which FGM is widespread are starting to rebel not only against […]

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